AIM YOUR PUTT USING THE GOLF BALL’S ALIGNMENT MARK

AIM YOUR PUTT USING THE GOLF BALL’S ALIGNMENT MARK

Nowadays, golf balls come with alignment marks on them. When you pick up a golf ball and examine it, you will see a mark –precisely an arrow-like mark. The purpose of that mark is to keep you aligned with the hole you’re targeting. Interestingly, the alignment mark gives you a great chance to aim your putt. If you would like to get your putt right using the golf ball’s alignment mark, ensure you read this article to the concluding line.

How to Use the Alignment Mark

Using the alignment mark is pretty simple. The first thing you need is to survey clearly and then position the golf ball ahead of your marker. This is done to ensure the arrow points down your starting line. After the placement of the golf ball, move backward a little bit and try to examine the arrow once again to see that it is facing your desired direction. The angle from which you’re sighting the arrow is perpendicular to the one you just had. At this juncture, you need to convince yourself that the arrow is now facing the desired direction i.e., you should be certain that the arrow is pointing down the line on which you want to set off the golf ball. Guessing will do you no good here. At best, you have to be damn sure that if you set off the golf ball on that line, you will hit the target i.e., the ball will roll into the hole.

To make the best out of this process, you need to instill confidence (i.e., firm trust) in your placement of the ball on the appropriate starting line. In your observation, you should take note of two angles by verifying the arrow from the back of the ball and from over the ball. Don’t go ahead to the putt until you have verified from the two angles and ascertained that the alignment mark is pointing along the appropriate line.

If you believe your observation (from the two angles) is thorough, you can then bend over and take up the ball marker. All you need now is to pay attention to the line the arrow points to and stroke the putt along that line.

 

In conclusion, the process explained above is very good for a putt of two or longer feet and if you’re still feeling uncertain about your observation, endeavor to check if there is a need for an adjustment before you finally stroke the putt.


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